Enkouji

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For about three or four years, I have known about, read about, and occasionally engaged in the Japanese practice of zazen, or “just sitting”. My discipline has varied, but originally inspired by the slightly more conversational tone of Soto Zen master (and former Zero Defects Bassist) Brad Warner in his book Sit Down and Shut Up, I have found something of an affinity for sitting and doing absolutely nothing, which is a lot harder than it sounds, and quite strange.

sdsu-lar

Brad Warner’s books look like this.

My field informants in my second village in Namibia avoided me for days when I started sitting there as unfortunately the position in which you sit to sit zazen looks quite a lot like a witching trance used to curse people. After assuring people that I had no idea how magic worked and was instead doing my best to think of nothing, a few enquired about my “Japanese religious practice”, but none fancied trying it. I used to sit every day in the field, a hallmark of the increased attention span and more ready ability to concentrate that living without wifi and screens seems to conjure, but have been less disciplined when back in Europe.

Keen to keep up some sort of reading on the subject, which is fascinating, and doesn’t ask for you to believe anything, I had a go at getting stuck into Master Dogen’s Shobogenzoa foundational text in Soto-shu and quite readable in English with a decent translation, provided you try and picture yourself in a Japan circa 1200. I nevertheless have not necessarily got that far. It doesn’t help that in the UK and in Germany Zen Buddhism manages to not only be a fringe minority religion but also to be considered a mess of the sort of cheesy think-positive Facebook reposts that your orientalist hippie friend loves sharing. Worse, people interested in Zen inevitably end up being asked whether we are trying to find enlightenment, or connect with “the astral plane”, or whatever vaguely “Eastern Wisdom” pastiche nonsense has unfortunately been filtered down from the sadly misinformed “believe in yourself” credulous types busy trying to work out the healing power of crystals in between consulting mediums (media?).

I am an awkwardly resistant practitioner of zazen, it is safe to say, probably because of the connotations of being a white Brit into Buddhism. I am fascinated by it, particularly the benefits of a mind-body integrative practice upon mental health disorders (a cool literature review from an actual journal in evidence-based medicine is here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700446), and I have found, anecdotally, that it seems to work for at least one person. I am also fascinated by the concept of an entirely materialistic spirituality. More correctly I suppose, my reading into Zen literature and my words with practitioners lead me to the conclusion that the question of whether Zen is materialistic is a little bit unimportant. They are concerned with the here and now, flesh and blood reality, or, as they would put it: mu, nothing.

Zazen is also very normal in Japan. I was invited some weeks ago to sit with one of my friends at the Enkouji Temple, a stunning 400-year-old complex to the North of the city of Kyoto, which contains the temple itself, an array of immaculate Zen gardens and a graveyard, notable for containing, among its Buddhist inhabitants, the grave of a Muslim exchange student from Malaysia, Syed Omar, who perished in the atomic bomb in Hiroshima in 1945.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Enkouji Zazendo (room in which we sit) in the temple garden.

It is a beautiful place, although one upon my first visit I saw very little of, as it was still dark, and about half past five in the morning. Zen people seem like the consummate trolls (the fun kind, not the ones of 2017) in their tendency to mess with you. Morning meditation begins at 0600, which given the distance to the temple and the fact that I must travel there on a bicycle, means that my Sunday morning alarm goes off at 0445. Zazen is not, apparently, for the faint-hearted. Nor the cold-averse. It is inescapably February in Japan, a country known less for its forgiving winters than its avid snowsports scene, and not only is the Zazendo unheated but zazen is conducted with the doors and windows thrust wide open to take in the environment.At 0545, we take our seats on cushions designed to keep your bum a few centimetres from the ground, allowing one in theory to sit comfortably in the lotus position, which looks like this:

16735112_10158181031335103_12294186_o

This is not me at the Zazendo. This is me after a bath in the hot springs (hence the getup). I am not this warm, awake or relaxed at the Zazendo.

I still have trouble with my freakishly-long and bizarrely inflexible lower limbs over the whole Zazen period, but I am getting better. All set out in lines, the cushions allow for us to be close enough to others that we feel we are doing this together, but far enough away so we are not disturbed by one another. At 0600, Osho-san (the monk running the temple) rings the giant bell outside, comes inside, lights the incense, and so begins the first phase of the zazen. We sit for roughly 20 minutes, or as long as it takes for the incense to burn down to nothing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Zazendo in the light after meditation is done.

20 minutes is quite a long time just to sit still, and one finds the “monkey mind” (as the former president of the Buddhist society at Edinburgh University used to put it) swinging from tree to tree, chasing thoughts this way and that. In Zen, there are strategies to combat this. Breathe slowly, and count your breaths from one to ten. If you lose count, or your thoughts wander off, simply start again. With no distractions, the lights off and your eyes half closed and pointed to a spot two metres in front of you on the floor, it is incredibly hard to get to ten. This is no problem, though. All you have to do is return to counting your breaths. You might get to ten next time. If you do? Start again. If you breathe properly, you can also bypass your body’s shivering reflex. Zazen is very uncomfortable at times, and comfortable at others. It is boring at times, and interesting at others. Zazen is just like reality because that is all that it is. You’re sitting in a building with the windows open.

Here is the key point: Zazen has no objective. Osho-san, as well as all of the Zen people I have read, are very clear about this. If you think you have found enlightenment, you haven’t. If you come to the Zazendo wanting to find enlightenment, you might as well go home, because you will not find what you are looking for. The clue is in the name: Za-zen: Just sitting. The point is to sit, and you are sitting, so you are achieving your point. Just to be in the room, without disappearing off on some mental journey, is surprisingly hard. When I had the Rain-Man-like concentration of my fieldwork self, I could occasionally drift away from counting the breaths to just being there, but that is not something that comes very often to me. The slow counting of your breaths, in and out, is the anchor to come back to in the moment. It is something tangible, in which you can inhabit nothing more than the room that you are in. It sounds super mystical, but in reality is the polar opposite of mystical. There is nothing there that is not real. The mind will take you on flights of fancy (usually about firesides and hot baths, damn it was cold) but you must instead return your thoughts back to the breath, which is real. It is simultaneously very simple and very difficult to do.

20170212_073703

Pictured: Cold. This is normally where you wash your hands.

After 20 minutes, a small bell is rung, and we proceed to the walking meditation, a swift speed-walk around and around the Zazendo for roughly ten minutes, keeping eyes focused on the ground just in front of the feet, and hands held up at chest level, palms about five centimetres from the breast. My numb legs and freezing toes are more than grateful for the opportunity to move by this point, although forcing my feet into tiny Japanese sandals for the walk (I abandon my boatlike leather shoes at the door) is less than fun. Thankfully, nobody apart from my feet on the cold stone seem to mind me going barefoot. We then return to sitting as quickly as possible, and sit for a further 20 minutes (or one incense stick). Towards the end, Osho-san, as is tradition, walks slowly around the Zazendo holding a large wooden stick, which, if you bow to him as he passes, he will hit you four times with on the back, relatively hard. My friends tell me that the harder he hits you, the better he thinks you are doing, as he thinks you do not mind being hit harder. I still have no real idea why he does this, but as a method of keeping one “in the moment” I suppose it works.

Zazen done, we proceed to what I suppose is the equivalent of the”church hall” of the temple, a mercifully-heated room in which we prepare rice porridge along with preserved plums, greens and horseradish, and sit down to breakfast and to listen to Osho-san, who is much funnier than his stern demeanour within zazen would seem to indicate. We read the Heart Sutra aloud before eating, a difficult task for me as while I can read Hiragana (one of the three character systems and the one used for the syllable-pronounciation guide next to the complex symbolic Kanji characters) I do so very slowly at the moment. Osho-San was very interested in where I had come from, and why I was familiar with the basics of zazen, and he seems pleased that I was able to sit in the cold without fidgeting and complaints. Happily, I was invited back, and have been attending every week since. Attending so early also means we can explore the temple grounds before they open to the public (they are famously beautiful) and see the view of Kyoto.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A really nice place to be on a Sunday morning.

In addition to being invited back for zazen, I was touched and very honoured this morning (Monday) to have been invited out of the blue to a tea ceremony hosted by Osho-san, along with his sensei (teacher of the tea ceremony. It takes months to learn), in the special tea room attached to his house within the temple grounds. This tea ceremony began at the relatively-late hour of 0830, and so it was a leisurely morning cycle ride up to Enkouji rather than a freezing, dark slog to attempt to wake and warm up as it is usually every Sunday.

Everything about the tea ceremony was ritualised. We must sit (or kneel really) on the floor after entering through a tiny hatch, designed so that everyone, rich or poor, no matter their status, would have to bow upon entry. This is by design. Also by design is that it is small enough that you cannot go through while wearing a katana, thus encouraging the ceremony’s ancient and more, well, violent practitioners to solve their differences with the tongue rather than the blade. Therefore, no matter my violation of protocol, I could at least be sure that I would not be cloven in two by any of my companions. It is not, incidentally, something I was particularly worried about, but the assurance is nice I guess.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The kettle is in the middle and the pink and white things are delicious biscuits. Top right is an ungainly giant losing feeling in his lower limbs.

The tea room is warm thanks to the fire in a small pit in the centre, and I watched keenly for all the times that I was expected to bow, accept tea, admire the bowl, drink the tea, thank Osho-San for pouring it, and laughing along with him and the others when sensei admonished him for doing occasional things wrong. She intimated that it was impossible to stop learning how to do the tea ceremony, because you can always get better. She explained and we appreciated the fact that this was the only time when we would be having tea exactly in this way, which caused us to think of the time of year we were having it, how many times we had all had it, and the things that we would talk about. It was a very enjoyable experience, though painful, as sitting on my heels like that is not something that I have much practice in.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Osho-san pours tea, I listen to Sensei talk about all the aspects of the ceremony.

It didn’t feel too formal, either, for a highly ritualised ceremony. This was the day after my third week sitting at the temple, and so I feel very welcome here. I think my persistence in the face of the icy mornings is noteworthy for those others attending, but I would hardly be much of a Scot if I was bothered by a little cold. We laughed and talked (through an endlessly-patient friend and translator) about where I came from, what I was doing in Japan, and when I would come back. To be invited to such an intimate gathering as this was a very great show of hospitality, and as they have managed to do every week, the people of Enkouji have made me feel not at all odd for turning up and joining in, however ham-fisted my attempts with my beginner-level Japanese can be.

This is a beautiful place to be, and to attend not only zazen but a tea ceremony, two of the things I was most keen to do while here in Japan, at the same temple with the same welcoming people, was an experience I shall not forget.

I will also not forget the feeling of my feet in tiny tiny shoes when trying to walk after kneeling for an hour.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Life is suffering, I guess. Buddhism.

 

ありがとうございます, さようなら!

(Thank you very much, Goodbye!)

 

 

Advertisements

Spirited Away

Thanks to my PhD presentation, in which I attempted to justify my being invited to Japan by the African Studies department in the first place, and about which I was duly quite nervous, I’ve neglecting posting for a week or two. It went fairly well, though. It almost feels like I know what I am talking about.

Japan, or Kyoto at least, definitely feels like home now. I seem to fit in quite well here, and not just for the obvious reasons that everything seems to, well, work. I decided to test this by making a short trip the week before last to Osaka, Japan’s second largest city and centre for (so I was told) even nicer food and even friendlier people than in Kyoto.

20170125_151910

The author attempting to make sense of giant walls of advertising.

Osaka is mental. In truth, it is how I imagined Japan to be before coming. In contrast to the height-restricted ancient capital of Kyoto, a relatively small and sleepy place in comparison, and in which you do not have to go far in order to find yourself down a quiet back street of wooden buildings and bicycles, downtown Osaka has crowds of hundreds of people making their way through tunnels of advertising in between the skyscrapers. Accompanied by a Scottish colleague, I was always reminded of the fictional cities inspired by the unique organised chaos of the large Japanese city, in Blade Runner and The Fifth Element, for example. Thankfully, Osaka’s streets are for now merely two-dimensional. Street food vendors tried (and succeeded) in attracting our attention, so much so in fact that actually finding a place to sit down and eat come dinner time was almost out of the question. The readiness of the vendors to speak English was also a surprise, though a welcome one.

It’s hard to make sense of, but in contrast to the unmitigated wall of experience that I have seen in large Indian cities, it feels crowded but somehow ordered, gridlike and concrete. There is not as much green space in downtown Osaka as there seems to be in Kyoto. We had a few hours to wander round and soak up the experience, managing to immediately off the train wander into the seediest part of town for some reason. Perhaps it was the anthropological sixth sense for weirdness, but immediately from the subway we found ourselves among some strange-looking hotels my compatriot informed were in fact examples of the Japanese phenomenon of “Love Hotels”, rooms you rent by vending machine to, erm, enable interaction of a private nature with those you might not want to bring home to meet Mum and Dad.

#themoreyouknow

Everything is done by vending machine in Japan. I’ve ordered ramen at a machine, receiving a ticket redeemable in the kitchen. I suppose it saves on front-of-house staff, but my Hiragana-reading isn’t much better than it was before I came, so I eat a lot of surprises.

I was under no illusions, however, as to the freshness of fish at a Chinese restaurant we passed:

20170125_144825

Which one do you want?

We specifically came to Osaka to go to the theatre, however.

We had come to see the Japanese art form of Bunraku, or puppet theatre. This is not the comedic puppets-on-strings you are picturing. Three puppeteers, two masked, one bare-faced, control beautiful hand-made and hand-dressed puppets. One controls the legs, one the left hand, and the lead controls the head and right hand. It is an intricate process, and requires an almost symbiotic level of teamwork between the three who control each puppet. Three are assigned per puppet, and do not seem to change to others. So natural are the movements that the lifeless objects seem to become people themselves, and no longer can you even see the puppeteers as they go about their work. The characters seem to manifest on the stage.

20170125_195748

A puppet of Osome, one of the characters in the play we saw

All of the costumes are stunning, and the puppets changed costumes in the half-hour interval of the play.

There is no dialogue as I would normally see in a play. Instead, a narrator describes what goes on in the minds of the characters, and does all of the voices of the characters, which sounds much more natural than you would think. His voice would change in pitch and intensity in keeping with the mood onstage. He would be accompanied by Shamisen player, whose musical texture added even more emotion and urgency to the characters’ actions and motivations. Occasionally, a different narrator (or narrators) and player would be brought in for a certain part of the play, and always introduced onstage.

Thanks to a earpiece in which English translations were offered subtly enough that I could still hear the narrator’s artful voicings, I can say that the play we went to see was called, rather cheerily, The Love Suicide of Osome and Hisamatsu, a tale of star-cross’d lovers reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet. You can find a summary of the story here. There is comic relief, mainly in the first act, culminating in a rather funny Bunraku-within-a-Bunraku Hamlet-style featuring a puppet playing air-Shamisen with a broom handle. The story, however, is painfully sad, and rooted in the shame culture associated with defying a betrothal and falling in love with the wrong person. A lot of suicide, and talk of suicide, normal for the sixteen-year-olds who were the protagonists I am sure, but rather shockingly not corrected or addressed by the adults. Perhaps in Meiji-era (19th Century) Japan suicide was an acceptable solution to a social problem.

It didn’t sound like a fun place to live.

Sadly, I have no pictures from the play, which we saw at the National Bunraku Theatre in Osaka as part of their New Years’ celebrations, as attendees were requested not to take pictures of the performance itself. Nonetheless, as a Shakespeare fan I would definitely recommend checking out the older Bunraku plays. It gives a bit of a flavour as to what living in Japan many years ago would have been like. The music and narration were particularly worth listening to, and I am searching out Youtube videos of Shamisen players to this day. My musical-instrument kleptomania also means I want a Shamisen, but that is fairly normal for me. If you are also interested, here is a more modern rocky take on the Shamisen featuring the The Yoshida Brothers.

 Osaka, then, is an absolutely fantastic place to visit, for the culture and the food, for the people and the experience of being in a huge Japanese city. I am, however, rather glad I live in Kyoto. I had a nice day last weekend, and I got to visit a place that I am very, very lucky to have on my doorstep.

20170128_132745

Kinkaku-ji. Yes that is gold. And yes I know it is another temple. I never get sick of these.

At the other side of Kyoto, merely a twenty-minute cycle ride away from my door, is this stunningly-beautiful Buddhist temple covered in gold. As it was a nice day, my intention to visit and see the sun reflected from it was shared by the entirety of the population of Japan, seemingly. Nevertheless, my freakishly-proportioned (for East Asia) body meant that I could take pictures over the heads of about 90% of the other visitors, even with their selfie sticks.

A Japanese garden completed the serene picture. Even with the crowds, it still represented a beautiful reprieve from the city. Thanks to some of my Japanese friends, in addition to my observations at some of Kyoto’s 1600 temples, I know worship etiquette confidently enough to have lit incense, made an offering and bowed to the altar of one of Japanese Buddhism’s many Bodhisattvas and deities. I felt a bit self-conscious the first time I did this, aware as I am of cultural appropriation, but the Japanese seem remarkably casual about this, and in fact I have been encouraged on multiple occasions to take part in the rather comforting rituals associated with visiting temples here. Nobody looks at me twice for doing so. The power of ritual activity in calming the mind is evident, and the notion of “believing in” a deity is merely incidental. The offering of ritual practice is what is important, and it is quite enjoyable. It goes without saying, of course, that my money made in offering is quite as good as anybody else’s, and along with UNESCO goes towards the upkeep of these outstanding places. Making offerings at Shinto shrines is similarly encouraged for foreigners, too. At one of the bigger shrines, the devotional practice of offering, bowing twice, clapping twice (or ringing the temple bell) then bowing once more, is clearly enscribed in Chinese, Korean and English in addition to Japanese.

Shrines, or jinja, are open-air and available for anyone to go to 24 hours a day, however I would probably caution against travelling through them on a moonless night, as I found myself doing with one of my friends as a shortcut back from the pub to our home district of Okazaki. It was Chinese New Years’ Eve, a day important for many in Japan, too. So, just after midnight in the first few hours of the year of the rooster, we were wandering through the dark and wooded areas around Yoshida jinja. I know enough about Shinto spirits to know that their influence is especially powerful in the shrines, and that not all of them were supposed to be the benevolent characters of Spirited Away. I am not culturally Shinto, however I will certainly admit to feeling a sense of unease as we ascended the lamp-lit steps through the orange gate to bow to the altar there. I put it like this: I might be an atheist, but I do not make a habit of camping in graveyards either. I managed to twist my ankle rather nastily earlier on, however I will not pin that particular mishap on the spirits. I am rather clumsy. I felt better after exiting, at which point we bowed once again upon leaving. It was a rather good shortcut, spitting us out right next to my street.

Aside from temples and theatres, another Japanese cultural event that I have taken part in was to visit a traditional bathhouse, which was something of an epiphany. I am afraid that for obvious reasons you will have to rely on my description rather than my photography to learn about it. I’d been intrigued by the Japanese custom of public bathing since I heard about it, and since my professor noted that if I was disappointed with my small bathroom I should go and visit the public baths instead, as they are much nicer. The idea of public bathing not as an event but as simply the way that you bathe, was very interesting. Very Roman, I thought.

I entered an ancient-looking wooden building, complete with plants and trees in the courtyard, upon its opening at 3pm, joining the queue outside. They were a mixed bunch. A family, clearly tourists, looking to experience the cultural aspect, as I was, were directly in front of me, along with several elders who were clearly regulars, and a bunch of lads about my age for whom going was a social event. Fortunately, I had googled Japanese bathing custom before my going there, so I knew most of the etiquette. After removing my shoes at the door (normal for Japan), I paid the paltry sum of 450 yen (about €4), and was directed to the men’s changing room. From this point on, the baths were completely gender-segregated. You remove your clothes and store them in a locker, taking the waterproof key with you along with your towel and your soap.

Swimsuits are forbidden, so I simply had to get used to public nudity. Fortunately, I have spent the last few years in Germany as a regular gym attendee, and so my British prudishness around the human body was very much on the back burner. Brits are a little backward in that respect. Nobody was phased, which helped. I simply imitated the others as I went into the steamy second room, in which a row of low showers were provided for me to wash myself before entering the water (an absolute must for everyone). This done, I had the pick of any number of pool-sized baths, some very hot indeed, one freezing cold, several with jacuzzi-style bubbles and one that was electrified, with a big sign saying not to enter if one had “problems of the heart”. I assume this was more to do with pacemakers than a rough breakup, but as neither were an issue I entered and was electrified for a few minutes.

Also attached is a sauna, which was terrifyingly hot but, as I am constantly told by Scandinavians, very good for me. I resolved to drink a lot of water when I left the baths. I had also heard of the Scandinavian tradition of sitting in a sauna and then rolling in the snow. I decided to see what all the fuss about this was by jumping from the sauna into the cold pool.

This was a mistake. I think my heart stopped. It was like swimming in Scotland.

By far my favourite place there was the wooden hot pool that was in the outside courtyard surrounded by a koi-filled pond and trees. If that is what bathing is like here then I shall never take a shower here again. What a pale imitation of cleanliness. Upon leaving I realised that I was about as relaxed as I had ever been without the aid of chemicals. Heartily, heartily recommend, and I am privately wondering why such public bathing places are not so common in the UK. I know better than to enter any place marked “sauna” in Edinburgh, though. The police raid them regularly.

Fans of Studio Ghibli will also be reassured to know that I did not let in any no-faced monsters to the bathhouse, and I did not meet a river spirit at all.

no-face-spirited-away-27383-2880x1800

Do not let him in. He hogs all the water tokens and eats people, and Haku will be really upset.

Apart from these events, a good deal of my socialising has revolved around food. There are a number of reasons for this. My lovely Japanese friends love food almost as much as I do, and the food here is utterly stellar. Drinking is almost always accompanied with food. It is odd to do one without the other, with the happy side effect that I never get that drunk, and I have tried so many interesting different types of food. My favourite is undoubtedly tako, or octopus. I cannot get enough. I hope it features on more menus in the UK in the future. We are missing out by not eating it much. There is odd stuff as well though. I pride myself on never turning down perfectly good food, and trying anything once. This is occasionally tested. I went for yakitori (grilled chicken skewers) recently, and they use every part of the chicken. Hearts I can get behind, as they taste really good, but liver I struggle with. I think it is the texture and flavour combination. Almost starchy, but it tastes like black pudding (blutwurst, for German readers). Odd, as I like liver pate.

And then, well… And then there is shirako.

20170117_193122

Pictured: Weird with a capital W.

What do you think it is? If you thought “brains”, then I can see why, but no. It isn’t brains. It’s fish sperm. Unfortunately, I knew what it was before eating it. As it was, the flavour was not at all bad, although someone had told me offhand what it was before I tried it, which was not ideal. I couldn’t get out of my head what it was while eating it, which sort of ruined the experience.

Jellyfish? Bring it on. Squid sashimi? Go for it. Chicken hearts? Yum. Pufferfish? Pass it along, but shirako? I like fish, don’t get me wrong, but no-one likes fish that much. Shame. If I didn’t know I might have quite liked it. It is, however, the only food I really would say that I do not like here. Everything else is amazing, and I hardly miss European food at all.

So it has been an eventful couple of weeks, and I feel very much like I fit in here in Japan. It would be easy, after learning the language, to live here I think. I like the way things are done, and almost everything that is strange is strange in ways that I like. I even recognise more Hiragana characters than I used to, and read a menu item for the first time last night without asking for a translation, which did feel like a milestone.

I like Japan, and Japan, so far, seems to like me. Sayounara!

Synowto

The past and the future seem to combine endlessly in Kyoto. The streets are almost unsettlingly clean, public transport is everywhere, you can buy almost anything, at any time, I’ve never had better internet connectivity and while shopping for a mobile phone simcard I was interrupted by a robot asking if it could help.

interruptingrobot

Deeply, deeply unsettling for those of us who have seen Doctor Who.

My bicycle even has a certificate of roadworthiness. And yet: Houses are made of wood here. So much so, in fact, that the “disaster assembly points” I had taken for symbols of the unstable nature of the Pacific Rim are mainly due to the imminent danger of fire. I’ve spent most of my time outside the office or my apartment enjoying the peace and quiet of Kyoto’s many ancient temples. History is woven into the fabric of the city, unfettered by the centuries spent as a backwater during the Dark Ages that plagued Northern and Western Europe.

They still don’t grit the roads though. It makes me think it doesn’t snow that often. Just before the real weather started, I took the opportunity to climb Daimonjiyama with a couple of friends. It’s a steep but short hill, the base of which is not ten minutes’ cycle ride from my house. It was a hot climb from the effort but the wind was like knives. We got a short period of being able to see the skyscrapers of the impressive Osaka 40km away before it closed in fully, and we sheltered in the Buddhist shrine on top to drink tea and venture out for photo opportunities.

kazumiandiondaimonjiyama

You’ll have to take my word for it that Kyoto lies behind us.

There is an enormous character 大 burnt into the hillside, which means “big” or “great”. Every August it is set on fire, in what has to be a warmer ceremony than standing on the top in January with the wind. We made it about fifteen minutes before returning to the slope down.

A hill seemingly right in the middle of town is something that reminds me of Edinburgh, actually, a comparison forcibly placed into my mind thanks to the hills, the castle, the old streets and the posters advertising art, theatre, dance and traditional Japanese cultural activities. Perhaps it is something about Kyoto being an old capital, as Edinburgh once was autonomously.

The climb was just in time. Waking up the next morning confronted me thusly:

20170115_070522

Unexpected.

This is actually the first snow I’ve experienced in what has to be years. A succession of warm winters in Scotland and Germany, not to mention my year in Namibia, has made this cold, white stuff thoroughly unfamiliar. Fortunately, my climb and conversation with Kazuki and Yuri means that I now know, after the coldest week imaginable, that air conditioners here in Japan not only cool rooms but heat them. I am in truth kicking myself, and thanks to the heater I can now actually feel it. My nights in at home are a lot more pleasant now, and while I enjoy working in my new office I do not feel the same desire to remain there as long as humanly possible in the evenings.

Snow or no, I was determined to spend my Sunday exploring a bit, busy as I am with work I know that I do not have as much time as maybe I would like to to see this wonderful city. I decided to take my bicycle, which, thanks to the lack of grit, was perhaps a mistake. It was blizzarding, freezing and dangerously icy on my way into a new part of town. I was hoping the hills would not be too steep. A climb would be fine, but stopping on a descent, even with my feet, would have been a challenge.

20170115_105020

Pictured: A challenge.

A narrow wooden-building-lined alley is exactly what I pictured of Kyoto before coming, albeit not in the snow. The whole street above was lined with shops selling almost anything Japanese you could imagine, including my first sight of one of the inimitable Studio Ghibli shops, commonplace in Japan of course but as a recent and geeky addition to the country I was distracted here for some time.

snowtoro

Snowtoro!

Nonetheless, I found myself quite soon at the fabulous Kiyomizu-dera, a temple originally built in the eighth century and dedicated mainly to Kannon, a Bodhisattva associated with compassion. Her temple is quite something in the snow, even if I managed to arrive at exactly the same time as at least three busloads of Chinese tourists (making it feel even more like Edinburgh).

kizomizudera

I fell over twice on the steps up. I was not alone.

In the inside of the temple, at the pre-requisite “no photographs here, please” bit, I was directed to some stairs that led down into complete darkness. After removing my shoes, I curiously followed the Buddhist mantra beads affixed to the wall and rounded a corner at the bottom of the stairs, relinquishing the use of my eyes and trusting in Japanese level flooring.

The rationale behind such a devotional practice is to make the worshipper vulnerable, to rob them of the sense by which they normally navigate and get them instead to trust in, well, their ability to follow instructions and keep hold of the beaded handrail. Around several corners I was guided. It was the sort of darkness in which I could not see my hand in front of my face. This is meant to symbolise the womb of the Bodhisattva, and my trust in her. I walked slowly, nonetheless. At the end a low light off to my right in the winding temple corridor illuminated gently a large, round stone, upon which I was instructed beforehand to place my hand and make a wish. If sincere enough, it would be granted.

I may be one of nature’s own skeptics, but, just in case, I asked to have completed my PhD by the end of the year anyway. I definitely sincerely want that. To leave the corridor was to be reborn into the world, and perhaps it was the age of the temple or the practice but it certainly felt good to pass into darkness and then light. Perhaps the mysticism of the event was clouded somewhat by being bumped into from behind by about four other tourists. It was, on reflection, rather funny, considering that the only words I know in Mandarin are “hello” and “thankyou”, neither of which are particularly appropriate in the context.

Kannon was not the only figure to whom areas in the temple were dedicated. I found many people lighting incense for a god of (I think) prosperity in business, to whom as nobody seemed to object I also lit incense for on behalf of Alison’s catering company.

templeincense

Does this mean she can’t claim credit for success, now? I hope not.

I rather like these temples, having been to a few. I think the main reason for this is the fact that even though tourists are welcome (after a donation, of course) you will still see many people offering worship and visiting deities and spirits in the midst of people taking photographs (where it is permitted). This is the essence of the past and the present melding together here. One does not have to lose the past to live in the present. Or, in the case of Japan’s level of technology and infrastructure, one does not have to lose the past in order to live five to ten years in the future. Culture does not, to contradict Indiana Jones entirely, belong in a museum.

I returned, through more freezing ice and snow, not to mention more than one altercation with a bus, to find my flat under guard, thanks to the children who live opposite.

snowman

Even the snowmen are neat here.

This not only did the job of clearing all the snow from the alley, but meant that I jumped about a foot in the air when I parked my bike and turned around to see it behind me.

It is warming up slightly as I write this, with the snow turning to rain on all but the highest of the surrounding hills. It was a nice snowy weekend, but I’m grateful more still for the ability to traverse the city at speed without my heart in my throat and my hands on the brakes.

Sayounara!