The Good, the Bad and the Bureaucratic.

We are still praying/hoping for more than a spot or two of rain. Peter described the weather at the moment as a “tease”: we get a rough cold downdraught of of air, and black clouds overhead, followed by thunder. We can all feel it coming when the wind gets up, but alas after a dribble of water the clouds move on. We think it might actually be raining, but the raindrops are evaporating before they hit the earth, and going back up to form clouds again. There is a meteorological name for this, however being but a mere social scientist I forgot it instantly when I was told.

It’s unsurprising the rain has never made it down, really. I found out upon my return to Windhoek that the temperatures I regarded as “unbearable” in Ondangwa were justifiable: Forty-two degrees in the shade. You cook meringues at that temperature (thanks, Mum!). You can also cook anthropologists as well. Such has been the heat that it got down to twenty degrees one evening and I had to go and find my jumper as I was shivering. It’s cooled down a tiny bit now; here in Windhoek I’d put it back down to the low thirties, which is fast becoming a comfortable temperature for me. The other thing the heat has driven me to is shaving my beard of five years completely off my face. As well as the fact that I am getting quite dark-skinned and my hair is fast becoming a foofy absurdity, I no longer recognise myself. Nor, apparently, do people who I last saw in March. I’m putting this down (at least with non-white Namibians) to the fact that I was told in Owamboland that all white people look the same. I wouldn’t know if that’s true or not, obviously being one. Answers on a postcard, please. I am also now sleeping under a net every night, besieged by beetles on every side, and hordes of mosquitoes intent on molesting me should I awake in the night and need to use the bathroom.

(No, you are not getting a picture. I eschew blog “selfies” because I am 24 years old now and officially a grumpy old man. Get off my lawn.)

I returned to Windhoek to renew my visa, and intended to stay only for a few days. We are into week number two now, mainly because getting hold of the necessary documents, which now need to be certified copies thanks to a recent rule-change, has proven somewhat difficult. My thanks to the good people at the Legal Assistance Centre (link in the sidebar) for providing me with a letter of association as well as some tasks to accomplish on their behalf when I return to fieldwork and the North. Nonetheless, it should be done and dealt with come the end of the week. I can then stay until February, when the process shall begin again. Joy of joys. The good news is that the LAC is also home to a number of people who can help me immeasurably with my research, in return for the odd bit of proofreading, which I am more than happy to do, as well as well-acquainted with  thanks to my position as one of the few native speakers in my English-medium graduate school in Germany. I’ve also been in contact with a number of researchers who have recently done work in some of my field sites, and have some reading to do of my own. All being well, I should be able to be published in a Namibian journal this year, provided I have something of value to say, which one would expect.

Windhoek has had some other advantages, too. I bought myself a guitar for camp entertainment, as I’ve been missing playing music enormously. It was a N$700 (€50) pawnshop prize, and I’m rather pleased with her. She needs a name, though.

I went into what I think is Windhoek’s only music shop in order to get spare strings and picks, and found two guys there not only incredibly happy to help, but who were also metalheads. We had a great time chatting about Opeth for a while before I reluctantly left behind a N$4000 Fender to go to Cash Crusaders and what eventually became my guitar. Some things I don’t think I can justify on expenses. Nonetheless, she seems to be holding together well, and I hope that people at the San communities I will be visiting like folk music, although it is more for my sanity than anything else.

On Saturday my hosts invited some of their relatives over for lunch. We had a great time, eating, chatting, then probably after not long enough a swim in the alarmingly green pool. However, the lack of fencing on the plot, as well as the large number of animals roaming around, developed into something of a horse-shaped problem.

At that point, the charming “Biggie” (not also known as “The Notorious H.O.R.S.E., although he really should be) had his head in the fruit bowl in the kitchen, and would not move for anyone. Eventually we took the hint and I charmed him and his cohort out of the house and garden with the promise of two bales of hay up at the stable. It’s quite hard to imagine that at one point I was quite scared of horses. This doesn’t fly here.

Lastly, I have booked myself a holiday. I’m staying in country, of course, but in between Christmas and New Year my girlfriend is coming out to visit me here in Namibia, all the way from Scotland. It will be amazing to see her after all this time, but also great to be able to do all the Namibian tourist-y stuff like visiting Etosha National Park and the Skeleton Coast without feeling guilty and like I should be working. I can’t wait to be honest, and it will be brilliant to have a two-week break just after Christmas. I might even finally get to see a big cat, although I’ve been reliably informed that this homestead here in Brakwater is home to a certain leopard, who may or may not have some cubs in the scrapheap next to the entrance. Rest assured, if I can think of a way to take pictures of them without having my arm ripped off by an irate mother, I will do so. Going and looking for them seems a prime way to get myself a Darwin Award, though.

I’m afraid that is pretty much what has been going on recently. It’s a short post, but hopefully soon I should have this visa business sorted, and be back up North doing research, as I am supposed to me. Ever it is bureaucracy that stands in the way of progress, but quite a lot of good has come of being here in Windhoek, and I’m planned out all the way through until January. Ideally next time I post I should have some more fieldnote extracts for you. We, as ever, shall see.

Tschuß!

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